Research Library

Fizika’s work is informed by scientific research in the fields of active learning and healthy aging.

Active Learning Through Movement

Active Learning is an essential component of child development in the early years; children were literally born to learn by actively exploring the world around them. A child’s level of activity is directly connected to their physical, intellectual, creative, linguistic, social and emotional development (known as the whole child). As a child grows and matures, their academic skills and level of success are often affected by their diet and level of physical activity. Two articles that support active learning due to its critical role in child development and academic achievement are:  Active Learning for Infants and Toddlers (Lockhart, 2011), which examines AL in Early Childhood education settings; and  Active Education: Growing Evidence on Physical Activity and Academic Performance (Castelli, D., et. al., 2015), which provides an overview of recent research findings supporting the impact of physical activity and fitness on academic performance in students of varying age/grade ranges.

Healthy Aging

Neuroscience research is uncovering new information  about how our brains learn and adapt as we age. This rapidly growing field is leading to new insight on how important diet and exercise, hydration and sleep are to reducing the risk of cognitive impairment.

The two year study found a significant beneficial intervention effect on cognitive performance:  memory, executive function and psychomotor speed. For more information on the FINGER study and other important research, visit www.alzheimersprevention.org

  • Dietary guidance
  • Physical activity
  • Cognitive training and social activities
  • Intensive monitoring and management of metabolic and vascular risk factors

The study implies exercise “prescriptions” could help protect the brain from Alzheimer’s disease.  The study was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

A prominent and oft-cited study is funded in part by the Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation.  The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) applied a multidomain approach to dementia prevention. The intervention components are:

A recent study conducted by scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that participants who exercised for an hour a day showed healthier levels of glucose metabolism than those who didn’t.  The study used accelerometers to measure a week’s worth of physical activity for 93 middle aged volunteers, all at high genetic risk of Alzheimer’s but not showing signs of the disease. Physical activity was split into light, moderate and vigorous.  

Did you know you can beat stress, lift your mood, fight memory loss, sharpen your intellect, and function better than ever simply by elevating your heart rate and breaking a sweat? The evidence is incontrovertible: aerobic exercise physically remodels our brains for peak performance.

SPARK

The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain

Did you know you can beat stress, lift your mood, fight memory loss, sharpen your intellect, and function better than ever simply by elevating your heart rate and breaking a sweat? The evidence is incontrovertible: aerobic exercise physically remodels our brains for peak performance.

by Fizika Group

Spark: Discussion Guide

Interested in bringing the power of SPARK into your learning environment?  Consider purchasing the SPARK Discussion Guide developed by Fizika Group’s team of highly qualified professionals.  Each chapter of the book is reflected in a series of discussion questions that enable teams to apply the research in your teaching environment.  Suggested enrichment activities, and before and after exercise sessions help cement the learning and will help you incorporate all school movement into your teaching environment.  13 pages in length, available as a downloadable PDF so you can easily copy and share your colleagues. 

GO WILD

Eat Fat, Run Free, Be Social, and Follow Evolution’s Other Rules for Total Health and Well-Being

Did you know you can beat stress, lift your mood, fight memory loss, sharpen your intellect, and function better than ever simply by elevating your heart rate and breaking a sweat? The evidence is incontrovertible: aerobic exercise physically remodels our brains for peak performance.

The scientific evidence behind why maintaining a lifestyle more like that of our ancestors will restore our health and well-being. 

In GO WILD, Harvard Medical School Professor John Ratey, MD, and journalist Richard Manning reveal that although civilization has rapidly evolved, our bodies have not kept pace. This mismatch affects every area of our lives, from our general physical health to our emotional wellbeing. Investigating the power of living according to our genes in the areas of diet, exercise, sleep, nature, mindfulness and more, GO WILD examines how tapping into our core DNA combats modern disease and psychological afflictions, from Autism and Depression to Diabetes and Heart Disease. By focusing on the ways of the past, it is possible to secure a healthier and happier future, and GO WILD will show you how.

Research Library January 16, 2019